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David R. Scott
05-02-2000, 10:43 PM
I'm considering buying a 1977 530i in good, if a little blemished, condition. It has been sitting for a year and was parked because of a mysterious fuel delivery problem. Seems that the car will turn over and run, but will soon flood and choke out. Anyone have this kind of experience with the 530, or other BMW with the same fuel injection system?<p>I think it is a pretty good price--$1,000 Canadian (that's about 17 cents US!)--for a car that will be fun to drive and looks pretty good.<p>Please advise.<br>

WH
05-03-2000, 01:10 AM
<i>: I'm considering buying a 1977 530i in good, if a little blemished, condition. It has been sitting for a year and was parked because of a mysterious fuel delivery problem. Seems that the car will turn over and run, but will soon flood and choke out. Anyone have this kind of experience with the 530, or other BMW with the same fuel injection system?<p>: I think it is a pretty good price--$1,000 Canadian (that's about 17 cents US!)--for a car that will be fun to drive and looks pretty good.<p>: Please advise.<p></i><p>I'd check the Air Flow Meter to make sure it isn't stuck open/closed and that the air vane move easily etc. It might also have corroded wiring harness connections. Also the brush and brush surface insided the AFM could be scratched/corroded etc.<p>It could also be the fuel regulator (blown diaphram) or clogged fuel injectors...... <p>Also don't be surprised, but a mouse could have made a nice nest in the air filter container thereby blocking the engines intake system.<p><br>There are lots of possiblities for things to go wrong. If this is a US spec car car w/thermal reactors and the nightmare emmission parts --any of those items could cause running problems.But in general the L-jet fuel system is pretty reliable. The majority of poor running cars is normally due to engine mistiming/ bad wires/ fouled plugs bad cap and rotor.<p>Good luck!<p>WH<br>

David R. Scott
05-03-2000, 01:20 PM
<i>: : I'm considering buying a 1977 530i in good, if a little blemished, condition. It has been sitting for a year and was parked because of a mysterious fuel delivery problem. Seems that the car will turn over and run, but will soon flood and choke out. Anyone have this kind of experience with the 530, or other BMW with the same fuel injection system?<p>: : I think it is a pretty good price--$1,000 Canadian (that's about 17 cents US!)--for a car that will be fun to drive and looks pretty good.<p>: : Please advise.<p><br>: I'd check the Air Flow Meter to make sure it isn't stuck open/closed and that the air vane move easily etc. It might also have corroded wiring harness connections. Also the brush and brush surface insided the AFM could be scratched/corroded etc.<p>: It could also be the fuel regulator (blown diaphram) or clogged fuel injectors...... <p>: Also don't be surprised, but a mouse could have made a nice nest in the air filter container thereby blocking the engines intake system.<p>: <br>: There are lots of possiblities for things to go wrong. If this is a US spec car car w/thermal reactors and the nightmare emmission parts --any of those items could cause running problems.But in general the L-jet fuel system is pretty reliable. The majority of poor running cars is normally due to engine mistiming/ bad wires/ fouled plugs bad cap and rotor.<p>: Good luck!<p>: WH<p><br></i>Thanks for the tips. Much more helpful (and friendly) than the dealers around here!!!<br>DScott

Karl
05-03-2000, 06:18 PM
You got good advice from WH, there isn't much that can cause the L-Jet to run that rich. Vane on the air flow meter could be stuck open or an injector could be stuck open. AFM is easier to check. Take off the air inlet elbow and see that the "barn door" air vane moves freely. If so, take off the air flow meter and remove the black cover on the bottom (it's just stuck on with sealant). Check that the arm connected to the air vane moves with the vane and that it hasn't worn a track through the carbon variable resistor it rides on. Then put an ohmmeter on the leads out of the variable resistor and see that resistance increases smoothly as that arm moves across it.<p>Fuel regulator diaphragm would also be easy to check. Pull the vacuum line that leads to the intake manifold. It should be dry--if the diaphragm is broken, fuel will squirt out of that vacuum line.<p>A fuel pressure leak-down test will tell if an injector is stuck open.<p>Good luck

DScott
05-03-2000, 10:42 PM
<i>: You got good advice from WH, there isn't much that can cause the L-Jet to run that rich. Vane on the air flow meter could be stuck open or an injector could be stuck open. AFM is easier to check. Take off the air inlet elbow and see that the "barn door" air vane moves freely. If so, take off the air flow meter and remove the black cover on the bottom (it's just stuck on with sealant). Check that the arm connected to the air vane moves with the vane and that it hasn't worn a track through the carbon variable resistor it rides on. Then put an ohmmeter on the leads out of the variable resistor and see that resistance increases smoothly as that arm moves across it.<p>: Fuel regulator diaphragm would also be easy to check. Pull the vacuum line that leads to the intake manifold. It should be dry--if the diaphragm is broken, fuel will squirt out of that vacuum line.<p>: A fuel pressure leak-down test will tell if an injector is stuck open.<p>: Good luck<p><br></i>Thanks for the tips. You guys are great! I'll let you know what happens.


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