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Skid
10-19-1999, 12:39 AM
Looking for an E30 M3 that will be used at the track for driving schools, club sessions, and autoX besides being a daily driver. I'm wavering on whether to pursue a ready-for-track well modified (but likely thrashed) car or a stock, well-babied specimen and spend for the mods myself. The trade-off presumably is that the stock vehicle will cost significantly more all-in once the wheels, tires, oil pan, suspension, chip investment is done but the "thrashed" car, while good-to-go off the bat, will require more ongoing maintenance expense.<p>Advice?<br>Skid<br>'88 535is

Paul
10-19-1999, 07:41 AM
<i>: No reason to spend a lot of money for a low mileage, mint, car if it's eventually going on the track. Find a car that's sound mechanically and maybe needs just cosmetics. If you're going to gut the interior, do the wheels and tires, change the suspension, or drastically modify the engine you might be better advised to buy a track car to begin with. Modifications are expensive. <br></i>

Carlos
10-19-1999, 07:56 AM
<i>: Looking for an E30 M3 that will be used at the track for driving schools, club sessions, and autoX besides being a daily driver. I'm wavering on whether to pursue a ready-for-track well modified (but likely thrashed) car or a stock, well-babied specimen and spend for the mods myself. The trade-off presumably is that the stock vehicle will cost significantly more all-in once the wheels, tires, oil pan, suspension, chip investment is done but the "thrashed" car, while good-to-go off the bat, will require more ongoing maintenance expense.<p>: Advice?<br>: Skid<br>: '88 535is<p></i><p>I was looking to do the same as you and ended up with a combination of the two. A slightly modified car which hadn't been thrashed too much.<p>I'd go for the babied car and modify it myself. That way you get to pick and choose what to change on the car next and feel the difference each upgrade makes plus you'll have brand new parts not ones that someone else has beaten on. <p>I find myself upgrading parts on my car that had been previously upgraded by the previous owner but he didn't use my first choice.<br>Example: It had a Dinan chip, I went with a Conforti chip. It has Intrax springs, my choice would be H&R or Eibach. At least he went with Bilsteins and RDSport sway bars which would've been my choice. I have a feeling this upgrading thing is never ending.<p>

Brad
10-19-1999, 12:42 PM
Babied cars usually have NOT been driven correctly. TYhese engines need to be driven to redline very often to keep them in good shape. This is not a wife's tale, ask any competent s14 mechanic. In fact, a frined bought a babied car for he track with 70k, it blew the first time n the track, DINAN said it was because the car had not been driven hard enough for the first 70K, they could tell by the way the engine looked.<p>These are race cars form the factory, high reving machines, that need to be DRIVEN to stay reliable. I bought a heavily modified track car, did more mods and the car is very strong even with over 110K on the clock.<p>Secondly, mods are very expensive for this car. Even for me, who owns a aftermarket comopany and gets everything at cost, it adds up -- QUICKLY!<p>If you want a track car buy one from a CCA memeber somewhere who took care of it, but not babied it. A hard driven car does not equal a thrashed car, this is a flaw in your logic!


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