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Bryan Garner
03-04-2000, 07:29 PM
I need to know where the fluid level sensor is for the Power stering on my 1989 750IL I had to drain the power steering and after I filled it back up the POW STEER FLUID light came on at the check control panel. Please respond ASAP. Thanks

Callan
03-05-2000, 08:55 PM
This cute sensor[which was deleted on later models] is at the bottom of the reservoir, and slides into a tube on the worst possible reaching angle for servicing it. Don't be surprised if it breaks while you try to take it out. You get to it from the outside, at the bottom of the reservoir,if you're lucky. More than one car has had this sensor unplugged because the body of the sensor got wedged in the hole and broke at its base.<p>As for correctly filling an IL model, you have to have the car jacked up, off the ground, to get the right fluid level. You will also need to pump the brake pedal a few times to let the system set-up properly[with the engine off] . Only after doing this will you have a true indication of the level in the reservoir. If you just pour the fluid in while the car is still sitting on the ground ;you usually end up overfilling it and it rises over the top at the cap once the fluid heats up from usage.<p>This is only necessary on the self-leveling/rear suspension IL models, not the regular wheel-base models.

Bryan Garner
03-05-2000, 10:14 PM
Ok thanks.

Casey
03-06-2000, 09:39 PM
I recently changed the rear accumulators and when the mechanic went to fill up the resevoir, he noticed it was empty. So he put the car up on a lift and noticed a leak from the frame but could not trace it. I put a piece of cardboard under the spot and noticed it leaks just a few drops a day. Said it may have been the steering box, but couldn't be sure. Any thoughts other than what's in the archives?

John
03-07-2000, 12:38 AM
Callan:<p>THANKS AGAIN, I will rest comfortably tonight. I have been staring at this flopping wiring harness with big rubber boots and female spade connectors for 8 YEARS trying to figure out where it went. The "missing" power steering reservoir sensor seems to answer that question!!!<p>You've done it again.<p>BTW, How's the "other" BMW doing?? I've developed lazy start, cold and warm, on the Disco (Dribbling injectors I think). Doing the original Pony Express trail in Western Utah this weekend.<p>Thanks again.<p>John 88 735iL (226K)<br>79 320i (250K)<br>95 Disco<p> <i>: This cute sensor[which was deleted on later models] is at the bottom of the reservoir, and slides into a tube on the worst possible reaching angle for servicing it. Don't be surprised if it breaks while you try to take it out. You get to it from the outside, at the bottom of the reservoir,if you're lucky. More than one car has had this sensor unplugged because the body of the sensor got wedged in the hole and broke at its base.<p>: As for correctly filling an IL model, you have to have the car jacked up, off the ground, to get the right fluid level. You will also need to pump the brake pedal a few times to let the system set-up properly[with the engine off] . Only after doing this will you have a true indication of the level in the reservoir. If you just pour the fluid in while the car is still sitting on the ground ;you usually end up overfilling it and it rises over the top at the cap once the fluid heats up from usage.<p>: This is only necessary on the self-leveling/rear suspension IL models, not the regular wheel-base models.<p></i>

George
03-07-2000, 02:57 PM
<i>: <br>Casey,<br>Don't know about your mystery leak but wanted to<br>ask what you paid for your accumulators? Did you<br>install or have a garage do it? Labor cost?<br>I've heard it isn't the most fun job.<br>Thanks,<br>George<br>'90 735il/138K Back on the road/early Michigan<br> spring. <p><p>I recently changed the rear accumulators and when the mechanic went to fill up the resevoir, he noticed it was empty. So he put the car up on a lift and noticed a leak from the frame but could not trace it. I put a piece of cardboard under the spot and noticed it leaks just a few drops a day. Said it may have been the steering box, but couldn't be sure. Any thoughts other than what's in the archives?<p></i>

Callan
03-09-2000, 08:04 PM
The 2 usual suspects are the high pressure hose going to the power steering gearbox from the pump, and another hose at the pump that's mounted on the top of the pump ,and is of course very hard to change out. Is this a 750il or the easier 735il. Makes a big difference on servicing.<br>Spray off the affected area with Dawn dishwashing soap[or similar stuff] and clean everything up. With most leaks in this area that are on the high pressure side, you'll only need about 20 minutes of driving or so to spot any weepage. Your nose will also tell you that you're leaking, as the Pentosin fluid is pretty smelly, esp. if it's getting onto the exhaust manifold like it loves to do with the 12 cylinder motors.<p>Gearboxes can leak too, and the bottom output seal is usually the culprit. Somtimes the seal at the input shaft/coupling leaks, but you'll need to spot all the leaks to make a fair accessment of the work needed.

Casey
03-10-2000, 10:06 AM
Thanks, I'll have my mechanic take another look focusing on those areas you mentioned.

Casey
03-10-2000, 10:10 AM
The accumulators can be found for about $100-$125 each. You also need to by the hydraulic fluid which may cost another $20-30. Installation (which I left to a mechanic b/c the car needs to be put on a lift to measure the fluid level) took about 1-1.5 hours. This repair is worth every bit of the money before you even think about replacing the shocks.<p>

George
03-10-2000, 02:12 PM
<i>: The accumulators can be found for about $100-$125 each. You also need to by the hydraulic fluid which may cost another $20-30. Installation (which I left to a mechanic b/c the car needs to be put on a lift to measure the fluid level) took about 1-1.5 hours. This repair is worth every bit of the money before you even think about replacing the shocks.<p></i>


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