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Ben
04-05-1999, 11:09 PM
Just saw this service bulletin from BMW which says the M3 engine computer can remember if you hit the rev limiter or if you drive and high engine speeds. If you do any of these the dealer will be able to recall the information, even to be able to tell how many times you did it. The code comes up as high engine speed or racing application. Is this true and can the E46 engine management computer do the same?<p>Thank for any info<br>Ben<p>

Ben
04-05-1999, 11:12 PM
<i>: Just saw this service bulletin from BMW which says the M3 engine computer can remember if you hit the rev limiter or if you drive and high engine speeds. If you do any of these the dealer will be able to recall the information, even to be able to tell how many times you did it. The code comes up as high engine speed or racing application. Is this true and can the E46 engine management computer do the same?<p><br>: Thank for any info<br>: Ben<p></i><p>http://www.bmwmpower.com/ServBull/tsb/20797.htm

Bruce
04-05-1999, 11:57 PM
<i>: Just saw this service bulletin from BMW which says the M3 engine computer can remember if you hit the rev limiter or if you drive and high engine speeds. If you do any of these the dealer will be able to recall the information, even to be able to tell how many times you did it. The code comes up as high engine speed or racing application. Is this true and can the E46 engine management computer do the same?</i><p>yes it is true, and yes the E46 can...but i think the computer only stores "over revs" at soemthing like over 8000 rpms (which is the end of the scale on the tach)<p>Bruce

Andy T
04-06-1999, 06:32 AM
The M3 brain records 'over-overrevs' - i.e. when the engine revs beyond the rev limiter speed (through a mis-selected downshift - no, I don't want a detailed explanation of why it is BMW's fault that you can downshift at high speeds). <p>I believe all the Siemens-controlled motors will record this (though what it's got to do with 'racing' applications specifically I don't know). <p>Andy T<p>: Just saw this service bulletin from BMW which says the M3 engine computer can remember if you hit the rev limiter or if you drive and high engine speeds. If you do any of these the dealer will be able to recall the information, even to be able to tell how many times you did it. The code comes up as high engine speed or racing application. Is this true and can the E46 engine management computer do the same?<p>: Thank for any info<br>: Ben<p>

John W
04-06-1999, 06:43 PM
...just remember, every time we interface with a computer (e.g. use the phone (caller ID), charge card, walk through a dept. store (surveilance cameras), use the internet, use pay TV, rent a videotape, use an ATM, charge gasoline, use an "Easy Pass" electronic toll paying device, send an E-Mail, use Voice Mail, fly on an airplane, use a supermarket "membership card"). Someone knows it and can record it for perpetuity.<br>are you ready for DNA cateloging?

Lorenz
04-07-1999, 03:11 PM
<i>: ...just remember, every time we interface with a computer (e.g. use the phone (caller ID), charge card, walk through a dept. store (surveilance cameras), use the internet, use pay TV, rent a videotape, use an ATM, charge gasoline, use an "Easy Pass" electronic toll paying device, send an E-Mail, use Voice Mail, fly on an airplane, use a supermarket "membership card"). Someone knows it and can record it for perpetuity.<br>: are you ready for DNA cateloging?<br></i><p>I read an article recently about cellular phone companies in Israel keeping logs of the cells that a particular phone registered in at a particular time. In other words, they know where the phone was, and keep a record of this for (I think) at least a year, although it might have been even longer. One company even sells the records to the owner of the phone, so if you are suspicious of where your wife spends her time, give her your cell phone (make sure it's on!) and ask for the printout from the phone company -- it's a nice little map with the location of the phone plotted over time....<p>Yeah, that's scary!<br>

04-07-1999, 05:09 PM
<i>: I read an article recently about cellular phone companies in Israel keeping logs of the cells that a particular phone registered in at a particular time. In other words, they know where the phone was, and keep a record of this for (I think) at least a year, although it might have been even longer. One company even sells the records to the owner of the phone, so if you are suspicious of where your wife spends her time, give her your cell phone (make sure it's on!) and ask for the printout from the phone company -- it's a nice little map with the location of the phone plotted over time....<p>: Yeah, that's scary!<p></i><p>It's no different in the US. The police only need a court order to look at your phone records.

Nusz1
04-09-1999, 07:55 PM
I don't think they record the actual location of the phone in the U.S., not openly anyway, phone bills here for cellular phones only show the number's called and number's that calls came from, not the actual location of the cell phone like the guy was just talking about....<p><i>: : I read an article recently about cellular phone companies in Israel keeping logs of the cells that a particular phone registered in at a particular time. In other words, they know where the phone was, and keep a record of this for (I think) at least a year, although it might have been even longer. One company even sells the records to the owner of the phone, so if you are suspicious of where your wife spends her time, give her your cell phone (make sure it's on!) and ask for the printout from the phone company -- it's a nice little map with the location of the phone plotted over time....<p>: : Yeah, that's scary!<p><br>: It's no different in the US. The police only need a court order to look at your phone records.<p></i>

Lorenz
04-10-1999, 04:38 AM
<i><br>: It's no different in the US. The police only need a court order to look at your phone records.<br></i><p>As someone else already pointed out: here in the US, your cell phone records show only the phone calls you've made, and even then, not in as much detail. The records show the phone number you dialed, the time of the call, and the duration of the call. (Check out your last cell phone bill...)<p>They do <b>not</b> show the cell that the phone was in at the time the call was originated, and any cells the phone might have moved into during the call (handoffs).<p>What I was talking about is that these phone companies record the actual cell that your phone is in at any time, <b>regardless</b> of whether you're currently making a call or not. Like I said, for a fee, you can actually have them print you out a map with a plot of where the phone was at any given time, not just when calls were made.<p>It is technically possible to do the same here in the US because of the way the cellular telephone system works: in order to efficiently deliver an incoming call to you, the system has to know in which cell you are at any given time that the phone is on. It's just a matter of whether this information is logged or not...<p>That's right: every time you turn on your cell phone (put it in "standby" mode, not making a call), your location is being tracked by the cell system... Kinda like having a LoJack. :)<p>Incidentally, this is how they tracked down OJ Simpson when he was on the run in his white Bronco.<br>


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