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tangoj
09-20-2000, 09:24 AM
The following message was sent to me via e46m3 group mail @ egroups.com. I take no responsibility for the content, just passing the info along....<br>************************************************** **********<p>-------------------------- eGroups Sponsor -------------------------~-~><br>eGroups eLerts<br>It's Easy. It's Fun. Best of All, it's Free!<br>http://click.egroups.com/1/9067/0/_/_/_/969420136/<br>---------------------------------------------------------------------_-><p>I think you will all want one of these bad boys after reading the <br>following!<p>The following information written by Dan Tackett.<p>Before you can read it in the car magazines...<p>I talked to Dave Farnsworth tonight, who just returned from the E46 M3 Press Intro in Jerez, Spain last week. All the big US press was there, but Dave's one of us. His info and reactions:<p>BMW's published 0-60 time for the US car is only 4.8 seconds! Base price will be $45-$46K. First US deliveries will happen Jan 10, 2001. The US motor is the same as the European motor except the catalytic converters are placed closer to the exhaust manifolds (i.e. different or maybe no headers). This only costs an actual 5 hp, the rest of the loss is the conversion from DIN to SAE net horsepower. Also, the US car gets one-piece front rotors instead of floating rotors (just like the M5).<p>Here's what Dave thought while driving the M3 on the roads in Southern Spain and on the track at Jerez. Basically, it's like a 911 with a real back seat. VERY strong acceleration and a fantastic sound from the induction and exhaust, starting at 3000 revs. The "Sport" button on the console doesn't affect the steering effort (as it does on the M5), but it changes the rate at which the 6 throttles open. He had it at low revs, full throttle, and went from the button off to on. Said it was like hitting nitrous oxide, the car just leapt forward! Less effect when it's at high revs. Seems like it's designed to make the throttle come on more "progressively" for those who don't know how to handle sudden horsepower. Perfect for D run group people in a Driver's School.<p>The suspension is firmer than an E36 M3, and it doesn't understeer as much as a 96+ E36 M3. Dave likened the chassis to feeling half-way between an E30 M3 and an E36 M3, rather than continuing in a softer and more luxurious direction than the E36 car. He (and I) was worried that BMW was going to<br>continue the trend of making the M3 softer, heaver, and more "grown up." It is 240 lbs heavier, but the handling is quick and neutral; this ain't no poseur. However, if you leave the DSC button engaged, the stability control intervenes early and causes understeer (so switch it off for the track). The steering feel is excellent, communicating feedback from the road very well. Not like the concern expressed over softening the steering effort on the 330i (vs. 328i). The trick electronically-controlled differential has no effect during quick driving on dry pavement. It's<br>designed to transfer torque to a tire with traction under extremely slippery conditions. So ditch the winter beater because this one won't land in the ditch. The seats are wonderful too. They have <br>adjustable side bolsters, with air bladders that can tighten or loosen the lateral support. You can clamp yourself in before a sporting drive and release the seats to tackle traffic on the way to work. It's about time BMW put adjustable bolsters on their seats like my former '89 Supra Turbo had! The seats are all leather, with an option (that should make it here) of a cloth insert with leather bolsters--cool. Dave is concerned that the 6-spd has more opportunities to miss a shift and buzz the valves (he found 6th when seeking 4th, that direction is OK).<p>It's a very involving car, with a great-sounding engine, an active ride, and alive steering. BMW knows it has a winner here and is being coy about other body styles. A cabrio is likely, but they are very negative on the idea of a sedan (they just don't understand that the US market loved the<br>E36 sedan. They kinda liked the idea of a Touring, though). They also don't see the demand for a lightweight version for a while since there's so much built up for the regular M3 Coupe. We'll have to see how the supply and demand equation works out until about this time next year. Then it might make sense to get on a favorite BMW dealer's list for a 2002 model, if they still keep a list then.<p>Ooh Baby!!<p>-Dan<p>************************************************** **********<p>I know I like the sounds of this. It confirms some fo the items in Jim's ordering pages. Thanks.<p>tangoj<br>

Luke
09-20-2000, 02:56 PM
<i><br>What happened to the variable valving of the power-steering unit that was supposed to be controlled by the switch????<p><p><br>The following message was sent to me via e46m3 group mail @ egroups.com. I take no responsibility for the content, just passing the info along....<br>************************************************** **********<p>-------------------------- eGroups Sponsor -------------------------~-~><br>eGroups eLerts<br>It's Easy. It's Fun. Best of All, it's Free!<br>http://click.egroups.com/1/9067/0/_/_/_/969420136/<br>---------------------------------------------------------------------_-><p>I think you will all want one of these bad boys after reading the <br>following!<p>The following information written by Dan Tackett.<p>Before you can read it in the car magazines...<p>I talked to Dave Farnsworth tonight, who just returned from the E46 M3 Press Intro in Jerez, Spain last week. All the big US press was there, but Dave's one of us. His info and reactions:<p>BMW's published 0-60 time for the US car is only 4.8 seconds! Base price will be $45-$46K. First US deliveries will happen Jan 10, 2001. The US motor is the same as the European motor except the catalytic converters are placed closer to the exhaust manifolds (i.e. different or maybe no headers). This only costs an actual 5 hp, the rest of the loss is the conversion from DIN to SAE net horsepower. Also, the US car gets one-piece front rotors instead of floating rotors (just like the M5).<p>Here's what Dave thought while driving the M3 on the roads in Southern Spain and on the track at Jerez. Basically, it's like a 911 with a real back seat. VERY strong acceleration and a fantastic sound from the induction and exhaust, starting at 3000 revs. The "Sport" button on the console doesn't affect the steering effort (as it does on the M5), but it changes the rate at which the 6 throttles open. He had it at low revs, full throttle, and went from the button off to on. Said it was like hitting nitrous oxide, the car just leapt forward! Less effect when it's at high revs. Seems like it's designed to make the throttle come on more "progressively" for those who don't know how to handle sudden horsepower. Perfect for D run group people in a Driver's School.<p>The suspension is firmer than an E36 M3, and it doesn't understeer as much as a 96+ E36 M3. Dave likened the chassis to feeling half-way between an E30 M3 and an E36 M3, rather than continuing in a softer and more luxurious direction than the E36 car. He (and I) was worried that BMW was going to<br>continue the trend of making the M3 softer, heaver, and more "grown up." It is 240 lbs heavier, but the handling is quick and neutral; this ain't no poseur. However, if you leave the DSC button engaged, the stability control intervenes early and causes understeer (so switch it off for the track). The steering feel is excellent, communicating feedback from the road very well. Not like the concern expressed over softening the steering effort on the 330i (vs. 328i). The trick electronically-controlled differential has no effect during quick driving on dry pavement. It's<br>designed to transfer torque to a tire with traction under extremely slippery conditions. So ditch the winter beater because this one won't land in the ditch. The seats are wonderful too. They have <br>adjustable side bolsters, with air bladders that can tighten or loosen the lateral support. You can clamp yourself in before a sporting drive and release the seats to tackle traffic on the way to work. It's about time BMW put adjustable bolsters on their seats like my former '89 Supra Turbo had! The seats are all leather, with an option (that should make it here) of a cloth insert with leather bolsters--cool. Dave is concerned that the 6-spd has more opportunities to miss a shift and buzz the valves (he found 6th when seeking 4th, that direction is OK).<p>It's a very involving car, with a great-sounding engine, an active ride, and alive steering. BMW knows it has a winner here and is being coy about other body styles. A cabrio is likely, but they are very negative on the idea of a sedan (they just don't understand that the US market loved the<br>E36 sedan. They kinda liked the idea of a Touring, though). They also don't see the demand for a lightweight version for a while since there's so much built up for the regular M3 Coupe. We'll have to see how the supply and demand equation works out until about this time next year. Then it might make sense to get on a favorite BMW dealer's list for a 2002 model, if they still keep a list then.<p>Ooh Baby!!<p>-Dan<p>************************************************** **********<p>I know I like the sounds of this. It confirms some fo the items in Jim's ordering pages. Thanks.<p>tangoj<p></i><br>


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