Roadfly.com         Roadfly Home | Features | Car Review Videos | Car Reviews | Cars For Sale | Used Car Parts Classifieds | Forum | Car Review Archives | Forum Archives Index



PDA



RBR
12-05-2001, 01:09 AM
I have driven manual, but daily drive is an auto, and considering of getting a manual E36 M3. This overrev/misshifts is really concerning me. Fixeable? Or just a matter of shifting style? <p>Thanks,<br>RBR<br>633csi

RBR
12-05-2001, 01:30 AM
P.S. $10k to fix an overrev/misshift incident? OUCH!!!!!<p>

cameron
12-05-2001, 01:37 AM
<i><br>P.S. $10k to fix an overrev/misshift incident? OUCH!!!!!<p></i><br>

M3freak
12-05-2001, 03:06 AM
Something like 95% of Europeans drive stick shifts and I don't believe overrevs due to missed 3-4 upshifts are really happening that often. Actually, the first time I heard about this phenomenon was after I moved to the US (I'm European originally).<p>Note that to hurt your engine, two things need to happen: you need to mis-shift *and* the result of this needs to actually overrev the engine. If in normal "comfortable" driving you shift from 3-4 somewhere before you reach 4000 rpm, a missed shift will definitely cause the revs to go way up, but it is unlikely that you'll actually overrev the engine. More likely, the revs will briefly go to something like 6000 rpm until your left foot presses the clutch again in a reflex.<p>In my opinion this means that you are only really at risk when missing a 3-4 upshift initiated at revs >4000 rpm or so. This means you are pushing it and are probably (hopefully anyway) concentrating on your driving.<p>I think it all boils down to proper shifting technique. Make sure never to "grasp" the shift lever with all your fingers. Instead, *guide* the lever by pushing or pulling it with the inside of your hand. This way, it is very easy to ensure that for a 3-4 upshift you do not apply any lateral pressure such that the chance that the gearbox "finds" 2nd unintentionally becomes very small.<p>Conclusions: <br>- for regular driving you are not at risk. <br>- for sporty (track?) driving there might be a small chance, but if you like high performance driving you would never want an automatic would you?<p>Get a manual and enjoy the true power of an M3!<br>

TiAg ///M3/4
12-05-2001, 04:22 AM
The paragraph preceding the conclusions section summarizes what I learned when I was researching this problem a few months ago, and it feels pretty good. <p>I've made a conscious effort to learn my shifting technique using the "guide" rather than "grab" philosophy. I usually rely on friction between my palm and the shift lever (don't say it ;) to create the fore-aft motion (don't say it again), while my palm acts as a kind of enforcer against inappropriate lateral movement. My palm is usually no more than 20 or 30 degrees off from the fore-aft axis.<p>The other advantage that I see is that this technique enforces a different hand position & arm motion for each gear ... it's very distinct. I'm guessing that this will help subconsciously as well (muscle memory and the like).<p>I'm in a bit of a different boat, as I'd never owned a manual car before (stalled the M a couple of times on the test drive ... *blush*) but it's advice like this that's made me feel pretty comfortable with this beautiful machine. (Can you tell I had a good drive today?)<p>Of course, my technique may be completely off anyway, but this, combined with the RPM-based mental soothing that comes with a little seat time, is a great summary of the dozens of responses I got to this very question.<p>Well said, M3freak, and thanks. Thanks also to everyone else who answered this for me and everyone else. :) I for one am *incredibly* glad I made the switch to manual for this car! Woohoo! :)

Vlasis
12-05-2001, 09:53 AM
The tranny is supported by two soft rubber bushings. Get it upgraded and it will much difficult to misshift<p>more comments and procedure soon on my site (like next week)

///Mikey Motorsport
12-05-2001, 05:21 PM
<This can be a real problem. The mis-shift that causes the engine to fail is typically fifth to second. It occurs when the driver misses fourth and mistakenly shifts into second. Since you don't normally get up to fifth on the track it's not much of a problem there. It can be on the street; particularly if you're distracted. The best solution is to ALWAYS shift with your palm facing away from you when you downshifting from fifth. This will force you to find fourth. <br>

///Mikey Motorsport
12-05-2001, 05:21 PM
<This can be a real problem. The mis-shift that causes the engine to fail is typically fifth to second. It occurs when the driver misses fourth and mistakenly shifts into second. Since you don't normally get up to fifth on the track it's not much of a problem there. It can be on the street; particularly if you're distracted. The best solution is to ALWAYS shift with your palm facing away from you when you downshifting from fifth. This will force you to find fourth. <br>


Roadfly Home | Car Reviews | Forum Archives Index