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Steve B.
03-17-1998, 02:34 PM
I found it interesting to note that yesterday there was a full page color ad for the MZ3 in the Wall Street Journal. (A full page color in the WSJ costs a small fortune.) If buyers are "lining up" all over the country to pay MSRP, then why the need for the expensive ad??? My guess is demand is turning out softer than was expected due to dealer MSRP price gougeing. It's too bad that BMW didn't save all this ad money, and instead offer it as $1,000 rebates to all the new MZ3 owners who had to suffer through dealer gougeing by being forced to pay MSRP. Just my humble opinion!

Darren W
03-17-1998, 03:50 PM
Steve,<p>Here's my 2 as an advertising professional.<p>The M Roadster is as much an image product as it is a performance exercise. Advertising it in the WSJ allows BMW to generate excitement about the whole Z line-up again, now that Boxster, SLK and 99 Miata have collectively taken some wind from BMW's sail.<p>With the M Roadster as the king of the Zs, all of us in the Z family, 1.9s and 2.8s alike, will feel a warm glow in the spotlight again as long as the M rules the hill.<p>And assuming BMW doesn't screw up its pricing strategy, the M's sticker price will hold the line in the coming years and we'll all reap the benefits when it comes to resale.<p>-Darren<p><p><i>: I found it interesting to note that yesterday there was a full page color ad for the MZ3 in the Wall Street Journal. (A full page color in the WSJ costs a small fortune.) If buyers are "lining up" all over the country to pay MSRP, then why the need for the expensive ad??? My guess is demand is turning out softer than was expected due to dealer MSRP price gougeing. It's too bad that BMW didn't save all this ad money, and instead offer it as $1,000 rebates to all the new MZ3 owners who had to suffer through dealer gougeing by being forced to pay MSRP. Just my humble opinion!<p></i>

Paul
03-17-1998, 08:51 PM
Darren,<p>Well said. The M will rejuvenate the Z3 image.<p>The waiting list at my local dealership is quite long. Thankfully, I was very near the front and took delivery on my Imola Red/Imola Red beauty last Friday. Based on the overwhelming interest my car is generating in a lot of folks, BMW has made a good move to help move thousands of Z3's.<p>Continued great marketing on BMW's part is good for all of us. It allowed me to end the lease on my 740iL 5 months early with over 8,000 excess miles and pay not one red cent. In fact, I received a small credit!<p>Go BMW: keep those resale values high. If sticking to MSRP+ on the M helps, stick to it!<p><i>: Steve,<p>: Here's my 2 as an advertising professional.<p>: The M Roadster is as much an image product as it is a performance exercise. Advertising it in the WSJ allows BMW to generate excitement about the whole Z line-up again, now that Boxster, SLK and 99 Miata have collectively taken some wind from BMW's sail.<p>: With the M Roadster as the king of the Zs, all of us in the Z family, 1.9s and 2.8s alike, will feel a warm glow in the spotlight again as long as the M rules the hill.<p>: And assuming BMW doesn't screw up its pricing strategy, the M's sticker price will hold the line in the coming years and we'll all reap the benefits when it comes to resale.<p>: -Darren<p><br>: : I found it interesting to note that yesterday there was a full page color ad for the MZ3 in the Wall Street Journal. (A full page color in the WSJ costs a small fortune.) If buyers are "lining up" all over the country to pay MSRP, then why the need for the expensive ad??? My guess is demand is turning out softer than was expected due to dealer MSRP price gougeing. It's too bad that BMW didn't save all this ad money, and instead offer it as $1,000 rebates to all the new MZ3 owners who had to suffer through dealer gougeing by being forced to pay MSRP. Just my humble opinion!<p></i>

Calvin
03-18-1998, 06:49 AM
<i>: Steve,<p>: Here's my 2 as an advertising professional.<p>: The M Roadster is as much an image product as it is a performance exercise. Advertising it in the WSJ allows BMW to generate excitement about the whole Z line-up again, now that Boxster, SLK and 99 Miata have collectively taken some wind from BMW's sail.<p>: With the M Roadster as the king of the Zs, all of us in the Z family, 1.9s and 2.8s alike, will feel a warm glow in the spotlight again as long as the M rules the hill.<p>: And assuming BMW doesn't screw up its pricing strategy, the M's sticker price will hold the line in the coming years and we'll all reap the benefits when it comes to resale.<p>: -Darren<p><br>: : I found it interesting to note that yesterday there was a full page color ad for the MZ3 in the Wall Street Journal. (A full page color in the WSJ costs a small fortune.) If buyers are "lining up" all over the country to pay MSRP, then why the need for the expensive ad??? My guess is demand is turning out softer than was expected due to dealer MSRP price gougeing. It's too bad that BMW didn't save all this ad money, and instead offer it as $1,000 rebates to all the new MZ3 owners who had to suffer through dealer gougeing by being forced to pay MSRP. Just my humble opinion!<p></i><br>A few more cents...<p>Darren is correct. The M Roadster ads generate new excitement for all the Z3s... Have you seen the C&D M Roadster ad? 'Wax barely sticks to it' All this new excitement will bring people into the BMW showrooms. MAybe they'll place an order for the M, but more likely they'll purchase a 1.9 or 2.8... Which is what advertising is all about, generating interest... BTW every car sold includes a few hundred dollars to pay for advertising...<p>Calvin - M delivery in April.


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