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gusser
04-23-2002, 08:56 AM
Anyone know the weight of the M3 flywheel? I've been told it has been lightened. My SC'd 98 328is has an 11 lb flywheel and it has much more punch (eg: thrown back into seat on accelleration) than the M3 due to the ease of spooling up. Has anyone considered a LWF? Has anyone even seen one for the M3? Would it upset the harmonics? Guess I just want reasurrances that someday it will be an after market option before I go and sell my old car - I know I will miss that part of the 328.

BTZ28
04-23-2002, 09:21 AM
Lighter flywheels allow lighter reciprocating mass and therefore higher and quicker rews. But that kills the better low end punch of the heavier flywheel.

Your 328 have the more punch at low RPM because of the SC, not the light(er) flywheel.

BTZ28

t00h0t
04-23-2002, 09:26 AM
heavier flywheels are better? nope...<br>
-Corey

t00h0t
04-23-2002, 09:32 AM
you are contradicting yourself.. you say a lighter flywheel helps in spool up and increasing response time.. then you say a heavy flywheel will give you more punch? please define your definition of punch. is it "harder to get moving so you have to punch the gas more" or "it gives the engine a punch while slowing down because of the extra weight"<br>
-Corey

gusser
04-23-2002, 09:38 AM
I had the SC first. When I installed the flywheel, all hell broke loose! I realize on the higher end I will lose out, but for running hot cars off the traffic lights the LWF is king. It is certainly quicker than the stock E46 M3. I'm looking for that feeling again without compromising the system. Anyone know of anything out there?

t00h0t
04-23-2002, 09:42 AM
down the road. I have a machine shop and we are currently building aluminum flywheels and rotors for Porsches, soon we will do other cars.. they are aftermarket flywheels and rotors for race only cars.. but I am sure people have put them on street cars. ;-P<br>
-Corey

BTZ28
04-23-2002, 10:33 AM
I did not say "heavier flywheels are better". You'd get a "torquer feeling" with a heavier flywheel because of the higher momentum of rotating mass (basic physics). But lighter flywheel allows you to rew quicker, and less energy loss due to lighter mass therefore more horsepower..

Hope this clears any confusion..

BTZ28

KJ-TypeR
04-23-2002, 12:03 PM
A lighter flywheel is better for high end. It allows the car to rev up FASTER, but it also causes RPM's to drop faster. This is great for road racing since it allows you to accelerate AND decelerate faster (since there is more engine braking).

Also, it makes the car easier to stall since the flywheel is lighter and has less "momentum".

As a result, a lighter flywheel makes it harder to launch the car hard because the flywheel is so light that it doesn't have much energy stored in it, and as a result, dumping the clutch will cause the car to bog. On the other hand, a heavier flywheel carries more momentum and thus dumping the clutch at the same rpm won't cause the car to bog as much, since the flywheel is harder to "stop" since it has more momentum.

gusser
04-23-2002, 05:11 PM

oddlycalm
04-23-2002, 06:46 PM


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