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  1. #1
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    6er guy looking to move up to an E9

    Hi guys. I haunt the E24 board, and have an older Euro 635.

    I have lusted after an E9 for some time, and after seeing some very cool ones at Pacific Sharkfest (and driving with them up coast highway).. now my son is hot for one too.

    Some questions:

    What is a reasonable price for an E9 in need of TLC? (or maybe a LOT of TLC)

    What are the usual problem areas?

    Where do you find parts?

    What are the CA smog requirements?

    TIA

    Scott


    -----
    80 Euro 635 aka Rosanante - Don Quixote's steed...ready to carry me off to dream the impossible dream... La Verdad...the Truth.

    88 US 635 aka Katerina - svelte, smooth powerful, sexy...

    Scott Andrews
    Los Altos, CA


  2. #2
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    Looks like competition for scarce resources...

    Corsachili has the right answer. Read the washing posts at your peril.

  3. #3
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    Yes | No

    And some other answers...

    It's impossible to state a reasonable cost for a fixer upper, since there are so many variables. Most cars that are in need of TLC also need rust repair and there really is no reasonable going in price. As corsachili on the other site says, get one that doesn't need to be fixed.

    The usual mechanical problem areas are the same as for early 6ers, such as center support bearings and guibos. It's the same basic M30 engine except with carbs for the CS and very basic injection (D-Jet) for the CSi. CSLs come both in carb and injected versions. L-Jet and Motronic conversions are becoming more common.

    The usual rust areas are the fenders, the firewall, the nose, the trunk, the floor, the rocker panels and the roof, on sunroof cars. Sunroof cars are more likely to have rotten rockers because the sunroof drains terminate inside the rocker panels, which are not rust proofed.

    Parts are available at La Jolla Independent, CSi, Maximillian, and (are you sitting down?) the dealer network, which has some pretty good deals on Mobile Tradition parts if you shop around. There are those who scoff at MT because it's not quite as grand as the Mercedes Benz equivalent, but at least it's there. Brake rotors and pads are the same as E12 based 6ers, so they're in plentiful supply almost anywhere. There are links to suppliers on that other site.

    Since all E9s are 1975 or older, no smog inspection is required in CA. That was rumored to have been the case with the recent smog law that got rid of the 30 year rolling exemption, but so far, there's been no sign of visual inspections being required. I suppose you might get trapped in a bureacratic SNAFU if you buy a car that was first sold in Italy (for instance) and is forever tagged a 1976 model and so would require smog, but that would be the rare exception.

    Anyway, most of us are at e9coupe.com.

  4. #4
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    Re: Looks like competition for scarce resources...

    Yeah; I read the washing posts..

    Than ks for the info!

    I actually have found the dealer to be a great source of parts for my 80 Euro 635. SOmetimes slightly more expensive, but I get the actual right part..

    Thanks
    Again!

    S

    -----
    80 Euro 635 aka Rosanante - Don Quixote's steed...ready to carry me off to dream the impossible dream... La Verdad...the Truth.

    88 US 635 aka Katerina - svelte, smooth powerful, sexy...

    Scott Andrews
    Los Altos, CA

  5. #5
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    Just saw your post, Scott.

    The first thing I noticed with the E9 is a problem in getting parts easily. I'm sure they are out there, but you have to hunt much more than with finding parts for the 6er. The nice thing about the E24 is that they share another platform, but the E9 shares it's platform, to some extent, with the E3 which is just as rare and hard to find parts for. I belive some E12 parts work, however, so you may find some parts are common with your early 6er.

    Still, I don't regret getting the car. It's way more of a "drivers" car than the E24. Handling isn't as good, power isn't as good, comfort isn't as good but the E9 is WAY more fun to drive, in my opinion. It's a hell of a lot easier to work on than the E24 was.

    Some day I'll put the engine/trans from my euro 85 E24 in it, but for now the engine is in great shape so I just can't justify yanking it out. Besides, I'd like to clean/beef up the engine first.

    Come on........you know you want one. They are just soooo beautiful.Kirk T
    1985 Euro 635 (in pieces)
    1970 2800CS

  6. #6
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    If your E9 can't out-handle an E24...

    There is something very, very wrong with it.

    I've had two E9s and two E24s, one E12-based and one E28 based. The E24 is a lead sled compared to the E9.

  7. #7
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    That could be. I know I need new bushings all

    around and new tires, but still completely stock systems - the bushing technology alone was far superior in 1985 vs 1970. I'd have to put poly all around.Kirk T
    1985 Euro 635 (in pieces)
    1970 2800CS

  8. #8
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    I'm not sure that poly is available...

    Except for the sway bar bushings. New rubber will do wonders, though. The rear subframe bushings are particularly subject to collapse due to their large air gap, but they're a lot easier to change than those of later BMWs.

  9. #9
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    That's good to know, however......

    my best friend is one of the lead bushing engineers at Lemforder (ZF) and he was telling me to try to find poly, if possible, for the E9. Apparently they only build the bushing when supply runs low and they haven't run those in over 10 years. The problem with this is that after 10 years the rubber has already started to rot, so the lifespan has already diminished. Not only that, but when they do run new bushings, they are the same formula that was used in the 70s which is "lightyears" behind even 80s technology.

    But, I agree: if there isn't poly available then new/original bushings are better than what I have on right now.Kirk T
    1985 Euro 635 (in pieces)
    1970 2800CS

  10. #10
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    Verrrry interesting...

    Too bad your friend doesn't have enough influence to change the way they do things. Probably not enough economy of scale to bother for these cars, though.

    The shelf life issue is enough reason for you to change your bushings sooner rather than later, so they don't rot away before you buy them! ;0)

  11. #11
    Velocewest
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    Yes | No

    You can use poly subframe stiffeners

    BMP or Bav Auto selles them (can't recall which, maybe both). They fill the voids in the rubber subframe bushings, mo' bettah!

    Tony

  12. #12
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    Yes | No

    BMP has


  13. #13
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    Re: BMP has 'em...

    Good call, I'd forgotten about them.

    Another option is liquid urethane poured in sometime before installation. Lots of detail a few years ago about that on the E34 board, I think it was.

    In either case, best to do it before the bushing starts crunching down upon itself.

  14. #14
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    I wonder if it is possible to get Paul to make E9?

    I'm not sure what's involved.Kirk T
    1985 Euro 635 (in pieces)
    1970 2800CS

  15. #15
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    The compliance bushing would be an issue...

    Number 5 in the pic has to be stuffed into the housing, where it expands inside. Probably wouldn't be a big deal to make the ones for the wishbone, but the compliance bushing is the main one that keeps everything in its place.

  16. #16
    Velocewest
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    I have Paul's compliance bushings on my e12

    They were not hard to install, just took patience, lubrication, and a trip to the hardware store to fab tool -- hmmm, that could be a recipe for my love life... (insert rim shot here!)

    I am pretty sure the compliance bushing for the e12 is the same as the e9, even if it has a different part number.

    Tony

  17. #17
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    Yes | No

    And it's still tight inside?

    No, not talking about your live life.

    I'm having trouble picturing how a urethane bushing would expand once in the housing. Or maybe I have this picture all wrong.


  18. #18
    Velocewest
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    Re: And it's still tight inside?

    It's the same size as the rubber bushing it replaces. And getting them in is a little work, as the urethane is higher durometer than rubber, so the rear "flange" of the bushing doesn't compress easily to slip through the hole. As I said, lubrication and patience.

    Tony

  19. #19
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    Thanks. Maybe Kirk can test your theory of...

    parts commonality.

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