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  1. #1
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    Garage Door Relocation

    Hey guys, new to this forum, but not really new to Roadfly. I didn't want to pirate goatboy's post below, but I have a similar issue. Sorry if it's a little long winded, just trying to include all of the details.

    I purchased a garage and detached house about 6 months ago and am in the process of turning the garage into my dream garage. The problem is that the PO had a 7 ft. garage door in a garage with a 12 ft ceiling. I am OK with having a 7 ft door, but I am not OK with the way the door goes vertical from the ground to a height of 7 ft, then immediately makes a right angle and goes horizontal into the room (as most garage doors do), obstructing the headroom. I would like to install a lift in the garage in the near future, but am being held up by the garage door opener.

    What I am thinking of doing is purchasing the Chamberlain Liftmaster 3800 jackshaft drive opener, which will mount on the front wall and allow me to remove the traditional opener. In itself, this would work fine. However, the other thing I would like to do is relocate the tracks that the garage door travels on. Ideally, I would have the tracks go vertical for 12 ft (11, 11.5, whatever) and then make a right angle into the room and follow the horizontal ceiling for the remaining 2-3 ft. With this case, my headroom would be virtually unobstructed and I could open and close the door with a car on the lift. This will also require relocating the torsion bar to near the ceiling.

    I know I will have to lengthen my cables to make this work, but my question is whether I will need new drums and torsion spring(s). As someone in the post below stated, the spring exerts less force as it unwinds, which is OK as usually the door is increasingly horizontal at that point and needs less force to open. That wonít be the case in my situation. Also, if I need new springs/drums, how do I size them for my application and are they available for me to purchase separately? Anyone have experience doing something similar? I have researched online extensively and found very little information, though I find it hard to believe that no one else installs a door in a similar manner. I also called a local company for a quote, but they told me they could only raise it to 9 ft and it would cost $750. (Uh, no. Iíll do it myself, thanks.) Any tips or suggestions you guys have would be appreciated. Thanks.


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    Re: Garage Door Relocation

    The torsion springs only work right when the garage goes horizontal right after it goes up. As the door comes down and goes vertical, the weigh of door on the vertical part of the track starts pulling the door down. The lower it goes, the heavier the door becomes. But, the spring force increases as the more of the door goes on the vertical part of the track and everything evens out.

    With my door going vertical, the full weight of the door will be constant. I'm going to eliminate the spring, and put pullies on the ends of the shaft and hang counter weights. Counter weights, like the door in a vertical track will have a constant force.

    I'm a long way from getting the details done, though. Talking to a builder this week.

    Your problem of having a the turn well above the door is a tricky one. The downward force of your door will not be linear (countered by spring) or constant(countered by a weight). In theory, a counter weight with a spring attached between it and the floor. You've got you a puzzle there.

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