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    Member No: 43372 mmindling is an unknown quantity at this point mmindling's Avatar
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    engine management warning light

    Hello, this is Martin in Southeastern Ohio (near Marietta). My car is a 2000 XK-8 with 29,000 miles. During the winter, it is in the garage under a cover. We have bad chemicals on the roads here plus
    lots of black ice. During the winter months, I start the car periodically (once per month) and run the engine for fifteen minutes or so. This is the third time this winter that I have started the car. My problem is: the engine management warning lot went on and stays on, but there is no message. All fluids are topped up, the car has not been driven, the battery is a little low but it started with no problems. Every time it is started in winter, the restricted performance light message comes on when the engine is still cold. As it warms up, the message always goes off. This time is different with the engine management warning coming on. Does anyone have any ideas or prior experience with this? I am a long way from anyone with proper diagnostic equipment (Columbus, 100 miles). Thanks for any advice or comments. Martin [email protected]


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    Member No: 182093 Calaveras is an unknown quantity at this point Calaveras's Avatar
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    Re: engine management warning light

    Hi mmindling: Sorry to hear about your troubles, but it may be that it's not really a trouble at all from my experience. You'll see I posted recently that my 1999 XK8 sat for a few months and then had a restricted performance and engine light issue on taking it back on the road. Sounds pretty close to what you experienced.

    I bought a $43 OBDII reader from Amazon and read the codes. Got a P0172 (fuel issue) and a P1111 (all codes read). I had no idea what the real issue was and, like you, my dealer is > 100 miles away. So, I erased the code with the OBDII reader and drove the car. Over 200 miles now and no engine lights or codes (just P1000, meaning all codes not yet read).

    In retrospect I had a similar issue with my 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee after it sat about 6 weeks. In that case a garage mechanic read an OBDII code for a fuel issue but said it sometimes shows up on long standing from pressure changes in fuel tank and system (I took him to mean temperature dependent expansion and contraction, but did not actually ask for more explanation). In any case he erased the code and the problem never recurred.

    So my advice is buy an OBDII reader, note and then erase the codes, and see if they come back.

    If anyone has a more technical explanation of what is going on, I'd be interested to hear it. According to the garage mechanic, this is both common and well known to automotive techs.

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    Re: engine management warning light

    Calvaras--an interesting post. Sometimes in the older cars, especially if there is a lot of garage time, codes turn up. One such code is when the fuel vapor purge valve gets 'stickey. When it gets unstuck and the tank's fuel vapors are purged, the code clears. This code tend to return more frequently with time until the valve is replaced.

    I agree that one of the best investments you can make is to get an OBD II code reader. Many will not only give you the numeric code but also a short translation. The reader will work on just about all of the newer cars and will not only get you lots of calls from friends with car problems, but will also prevent the dealer from inflicting you with expensive 'financially fantasies' because you will know your own codes.

    Just to add, the other best investment would be a good automatic battery charger like Battery Tender. Weak batteries generate crazy combinations of codes and lets the Spirits of Lukas' Gremlins haunt your car. My Jaguar battery lasted eight years with just distilled water and a Battery Tender. When my Battery Tender's lights would not switch to 'full charge', it told me that it was time to replace the battery even though the car started and worked fine. It warned that the battery was sulfating and that soon and possibly without warning the Prince of Darkness would be visiting. So I replaced it.

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    Member No: 43372 mmindling is an unknown quantity at this point mmindling's Avatar
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    Re: engine management warning light

    Thank you Calaveras and gladjag.
    As it turns out, the weather cleared off for a day or two and could
    take the car out on clean roads. After several starts and stops, the engine management light went out on its own. Many thanks for the advice and I have printed out your suggestions to keep in my car file in case this happens again.
    Best Regards,
    Martin Mindling [email protected]

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