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  1. #1
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    Yes | No

    Switched to Evans NPG+ coolant

    Been thinking about doing this for a while, finally did it a couple weeks ago when I replaced all the coolant hoses in the 99 coupe. So far no problems whatsoever. Driven about 600 miles, a couple hundred on the highway with AC on, the rest has been city/highway. The engine temp gauge stays straight up but I have noticed the engine oil temp runs about 5F higher than it used to. When the engine is fully up to temperature there is some pressure in the hoses but not nearly as much as with conventional coolant. If this stuff keeps prevents the expansion tank/radiator/hoses etc. from failing from pressure it will be worth it. I'll post updates every couple months since long term performance is what counts. So far so good.
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  2. #2
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    Big test today, major traffic jam. Stop & go, mostly stop, 92 degrees, AC on full blast, for an hour. Both the coolant and oil temps stayed normal. Checked the system for pressure when I got home and there was none! Hoses were soft and I could take the cap off the expansion tank- no pressure, no steam. This stuff seems to work just fine.
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  3. #3
    Robert Platt Bell
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    Yes | No

    Long-term is the issue, though.

    I am gun-shy about changing coolants after some bad experiences with Dexcool.

    I once bought a Mercedes W123 (grey market) from a Paraguayan diplomat for $1500.

    He thought he would "upgrade" to GM/Texaco "Dexcool" coolant, which is supposed to be "lifetime".

    It is the funky RED coolant you see sometimes. It is standard on GM cars.

    It sort of works, so long as no air gets in the coolant. If it does, it turns into sand and clogs the block (and overheats the engine). Google "Dexcool class action suit"

    The grey market Merc had an overflow hose, not a coolant expansion tank like in US-spec cars. So when it cooled down, air got sucked in, with predictable results.

    About five hours of flushing red sand out of the block (several times) I was able to run it without overheating (the heater core remained clogged for two more flushes, though).

    After that experience, I decided that sticking with the mfg. recommendations is a good idea, and that "upgrades" can backfire in a big way.

    With BMWs, the problem is aluminum heads with iron blocks (particularly on some US-spec cars) that can lead to galvanic corrosion issues, over time.

    There is also the issue of some older anti-freezes having a high phosphate content, which reacts with plastic radiator end caps.

    For all that hassle, the BMW blue coolant and DISTILLED water (99 cents a gallon, cheap) seems like a safe bet. I change it every two years or so.

    I would presume the coolant you are using will work OK and not have any galvanic corrosion issues. But that is a good reason to use distilled water - keep the minerals out.

    The big issue, of course, is bleeding. You can warp the head on a brand new BMW if you don't bleed the air out. See the Bently manual for more info.

    As for "pressure" in the cooling system, bear in mind that the expansion tank should be filled to the KALT (cold) line only, to provide room for expansion. Air is compressible, coolant is not. I wonder how many "exploding expansion tank" problems are the result of over-filling the system.

    I dunno. Four BMWs, and over 300,000 miles, collectively, and I have yet to have an expansion tank explode, a fan throw blades, a water pump fail, a radiator neck crack, or any of the other problems that are supposedly inherent in BMWs.

    Of course, I do replace some of these parts at about the 80-100K mark. The parts are pretty cheap, and it takes like a couple of hours to do.
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  4. #4
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    I'm not sure how this stuff will work in the long term and by no means am I trying to recruit folks to use it. But I've had enough pressure related problems over the years that a no-pressure cooling system appeals to me. There are quite few folks out there that feel the same way so I will post updates about how it works for me, good or bad. So far it's been a very uneventful change, the cooling system works just like it did with conventional coolant. This is a good thing. The only negative I've found is this stuff has a pretty strong coolant smell if any of it gets loose on the engine (spills, drips etc.).
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  5. #5
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    Three month update. The coolant has darkened slightly, this is apparently normal. Other than that there have been no coolant related problems. Been a hot summer, had a 10 day stretch of 100F temps and the rest of then time in the hight 90s. Car runs fine with no difference in performance. Still doesn't build any pressure in the cooling system. Did have a couple very small leaks (4 oz./week) related to the drain & fill and hose replacement process. Easy to find and fix, replaced the radiator drain plug o-ring and tightened the hose at the bottom of the expansion tank and all's well. I was worried how this coolant would work in hot weather due to the lower heat capacity compared to normal antifreeze/water. This is a non-issue, the cooling system seems to have enough cooling capacity to compensate for the difference. Curious to see how this stuff works in cold weather.
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  6. #6
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    The coolant smell came back a couple weeks ago. I'd park in the garage and get out and there was a slight but unmistakeable scent of coolant. The wife would walk into the garage and say "Your car reeks". The lack of pressure in the system means leaks aren't nearly as obvious as with regular antifreeze. It doesn't take much of this stuff to make a stink, I was losing an ounce or two every 250 miles. No drips, no spots, just a smell. Repeated inspections from top and bottom with a flash light and a mirror found nothing. Finally found it - a seep where the upper radiator hose met the thermostat housing. Looked fine, but when I ran my finger under the hose fitting I got a bit of tan residue on my finger tip. That all, but that was it, repositioned the clamp an tightened it and no more smell. The location is right behind the engine fan so when a drop would form the fan would blow it off and onto the hot engine. So apparently instead of dripping or spewing coolant as a problem symptom you have to use your nose with this stuff. I'm OK with that.
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  7. #7
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    It's been 13 months now since switching to this coolant and I can safely say it works just fine summer and winter, no long term problems apparent. The coolant has darkened over time but has stabilized at tea colored. Cooling system performance is normal and it is reassuring to have a system that operates at a fraction of the pressure it was designed for, should last a long time.
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  8. #8
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    Yes | No
    2 year update - no leaks, no cooling system maintenance (other than checking the level once in awhile) and no performance issues. Coolant has a dark tea color but is still doing its job.
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